Is the Mobile Watershed Oil Pipeline A Done Deal?

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Local weekly newspaper says the controversial pipeline is a done deal

By Glynn Wilson –

MOBILE, Ala. – Is an oil pipeline through the watershed of Mobile Alabama’s sole source for fresh drinking water a done deal?

One local paper says so.

I made the trek to Mobile for the final week of Mardi Gras and to get the latest on the pipeline. I interviewed Larry Godfrey and David Underhill on the latest developments in the controversy over a crude oil pipeline planned to run through the watershed of the Mobile area’s sole source for fresh drinking water. Watch and share the video here.

Non-union workers were hard at work on the pipeline on the Sunday before Mardi Gras Day in spite of a pending lawsuit to stop it filed by the Southern Environmental Law Center on behalf of the Mobile Baykeeper.

This is just one video in a larger package of stories in the works on the issue of the rapid expansion of petrochemical transportation and storage tank farms, oil pipelines and the importation of Canadian tar sands crude into the port city of Mobile by train — and the potential hazards.

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Non-union workers for Plains Southcap hard at work on the Sunday before Mardi Gras beginning the installation of a pipeline under Big Creek

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Big Creek Lake, Mobile’s fresh drinking water reservoir

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Non-union workers for Plains Southcap hard at work on an oil pipeline on the Sunday before Mardi Gras Day: Glynn Wilson

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Non-union workers for Plains Southcap hard at work on an oil pipeline on the Sunday before Mardi Gras Day: Glynn Wilson

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Substandard Korean pipe runs under the ground in a wetland leading to Big Creek Lake: Glynn Wilson

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Non-union workers for Plains Southcap hard at work on an oil pipeline on the Sunday before Mardi Gras Day: Glynn Wilson

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Non-union workers for Plains Southcap hard at work on an oil pipeline on the Sunday before Mardi Gras Day: Glynn Wilson

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Non-union workers for Plains Southcap hard at work on an oil pipeline on the Sunday before Mardi Gras Day: Glynn Wilson

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Non-union workers for Plains Southcap hard at work on an oil pipeline on the Sunday before Mardi Gras Day: Glynn Wilson

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Non-union workers for Plains Southcap hard at work on an oil pipeline on the Sunday before Mardi Gras Day: Glynn Wilson

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Non-union workers for Plains Southcap hard at work on an oil pipeline on the Sunday before Mardi Gras Day: Glynn Wilson

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Non-union workers for Plains Southcap hard at work on an oil pipeline on the Sunday before Mardi Gras Day: Glynn Wilson

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The massive drill bits used to bore the pipe in the ground under Big Creek: Glynn Wilson

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Non-union workers for Plains Southcap hard at work on an oil pipeline on the Sunday before Mardi Gras Day: Glynn Wilson

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The Mobile water board wants to keep liter bugs out of Big Creek Lake, but settled with Plains Southcap to allow an oil pipeline to run through its only source of fresh drinking water: Glynn Wilson

See our previous comprehensive coverage of the early public fight here.

More Than 200 Pack Mobile Bay Conference Center to Fight Canadian Tar Sands Crude Pipeline

© 2014, Glynn Wilson. All rights reserved.

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